inheritance/act_out (2014)

e1

e2

e3

e4

What is inheritance?
What is it to inherit?
Why is there inheritance?
Why is there no inheritance?
Why are we bothering to re-write the story if it is not ours anyway?

What is it to inherit? What is inheritance? Who inherits?
Who leaves it for you?
Why you?

What if you don’t want to inherit? What if you don’t have room?
What do you do with all that stuff?
How do you carry it with you, from place to place, year to year?
What stories belong to it?
What if you don’t want to be reminded?
How do you hold on to it all?
How do you display it?
How do you describe it? Who to?
Are you describing it, or is it describing you?

Where is the boundary, between you and the things, the things and you? Or between her who gave or left you the thing in the first place, and the stories that are stuck to it, as well as those that fell away. Are histories dependent upon objects, or objects upon histories? What is the boundary between me and you, this thing and that part of your story? Is it my story, your story, their story or our story? What if we refuse it? Can we say no? Where are we without it? What do you do with it after you’re done?

What is inheritance?
What is it to inherit?
Why is there inheritance?
Why is there no inheritance?
Why are we bothering to re-write the story if it is not ours anyway?

What if we make it up?

Elly Clarke, The George Richmond Portrait Project (2008-ongoing)
Elly Clarke has been tracing portraits by her great-great-great grandfather George Richmond RA (1809-1896) to private homes across the UK (and occasionally beyond) for more than five years, photographing the portraits and the living descendants of those her ancestor portrayed in situ, and conducting audio interviews about what they know both of their ancestors and the portraits. ellyclarke.com | georgerichmondproject.com

Kerstin Honeit, Becoming 10, (2007-10)
In the photo installation ‘Becoming 10’ Kerstin Honeit performs her ‘un-met’ 9 half siblings from the former East and West of Berlin. Based only on the information of age, name, address Honeit stages herself in their real environments and apartment blocks in imagined poses, using the gesture of drag. http://www.kerstinhoneit.com/

Lisa Jugert, History Vision Machines, (2010)
History Vision Machines turns the machine that records everything back on itself. Various camera models are presented both as subject and recording device. Matched with a mirror and a location fitting to each model, the series encourages a consideration of the manner in which our personal and political, individual and collective histories have been presented, and the influence of technology upon this. http://www.l–j.net/